Your Week in Pin Up Issue 54: The Wonder Woman Edition

5 June 2017

Hint: They’re Not All Superheroes. Or Women


OK, So We’ll Start in Themyscira

Because, Wonder Woman. But, seriously, the film also set a record as the highest single day gross for a movie directed by a woman EVER. And the biggest opening day for a female comic book superhero film. Oh, and the biggest opening weekend for a film directed by a woman.

And, according to a Forbes article Saturday morning, recapping opening day:

Fun fact, had men been barred from Wonder Woman screenings last night, the film still would have grossed more than the entire opening weekend of King Arthur: Legend of the Sword.

#girlpower


These Gorgeous Photos from World War II

Because men can be pin ups too.

From a new book published by Taschen.


That’s Montgomery Clift, Honey!

The amazing 1961 film The Misfits was on cable the other night. Clark Gable, Montgomery Clift, Eli Wallach, and, of course, Marilyn Monroe. I’ve loved the film since I was a kid.

The showing was part of a Turner Classics Movie Spotlight on Clark Gable, who died just days after filming completed in November 1960 at age 59. It was the last film completed by both Gable and Monroe.

BTW, TCM is featuring Audrey Hepburn Mondays and Gay Hollywood Thursdays for the entire month of June.


The Google Doodle from June 3rd

Celebrating the incomparable Josephine Baker.


This. GIF.

*SWAK*

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Your Week in Pin Up Issue 40: The We Will Not Go Quietly Edition

ywipu23 January 2017

It’s My Blog and I’ll Do What I Want To


The Women’s March.

Inspiring, but also a signal that we have so much work to do to harness this energy into political activism. Why I marched here.


And Then There’s that Tradition of Women Activists Crashing a Presidential Party.

Women protesting for the right to vote during Woodrow Wilson's 1913 inauguration.

Women protesting for the right to vote during Woodrow Wilson’s 1913 inauguration.

Just following in the footsteps of the suffragists, who marched for their right to vote. Check out the full story of the 1913 march on Mashable.


Speaking of Marching.

Martin Luther King and his wife Coretta Scott King leading freedom marchers in Montgomery, Alabama, 1965. Martin Broffman for the Associated Press.

Martin Luther King and his wife Coretta Scott King leading freedom marchers in Montgomery, Alabama, 1965. Martin Broffman for the Associated Press.

We’re part of a battle to get–and keep–our civil rights.


Speaking of Bad-Ass Women

Betty White turned 95 this week.


This. Gif.

tumblr_inline_n6ma3t1isu1qhgk1x*SWAK

The 2016 Girl Power List

Look 2016 has been a godawful year.

I’ve been posting the last few days about the amazing people we’ve lost in 2016, from music to film to fashion and art.

But I thought today I’d like to offer some optimism. Here are the women (and some men) that came across my radar as people I really admire.

January – Billie Allen

 Billie Allen, one of the first black performers with a recurring network TV role, in 1955 on “The Phil Silvers Show,” with from left, Elisabeth Fraser, Barbara Berry, Midge Ware and Fay Morley. Credit CBS Photo Archive, via Getty Images

Billie Allen, one of the first black performers with a recurring network TV role, in 1955 on “The Phil Silvers Show,” with from left, Elisabeth Fraser, Barbara Berry, Midge Ware and Fay Morley. Credit CBS Photo Archive, via Getty Images

We talked about her earlier this year, but if you don’t recall, Billie Allen was one of the first regular African American cast members in television in the 1950s. She died December 30, 2015, but her death wasn’t reported until nearly two weeks later. I’m a total media history buff, and I wasn’t aware of her contributions. Because she died in 2015, she’s also missing from many of 2016’s year’s end lists. And that’s a travesty.

Television viewers, at least those who don’t tune out their minds during commercials, are now beginning to learn that Negroes can worry about dentures, dishpan hands and bad breath just as everyone else in TV land seems to.

-The New York Times report in a 1968 article that featured Ms. Allen

February – Jenny Beavan

shade-oscars

The Mad Max costumer won her second Oscar in January, and didn’t conform to the standard awards show garb. And the reaction from the mostly male audience to this proudly middle-aged woman dressed for comfort (and in homage to her film) ended up going viral.

The only thing I would like is for my outfit to have a positive effect on what women feel about themselves. You don’t actually have to look like a supermodel to be successful. If that could be a takeaway, I think that would be a good thing. It is really good to have a positive feeling about yourself, because then you can do anything. People don’t have to clap for you; they don’t have to like the work.

-Jenny Beavan in The Hollywood Reporter

March – Kathryn Borel

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The ex-Canadian Broadcasting Corporation staffer was the first woman to accuse her boss Jian Ghomeshi of sexual harassment (20 women eventually would also accuse him). The charges by the other women ended up in an acquittal in March, but Borel nonetheless stood by her guns and Ghomeshi ended up issuing a public “peace bond” and apology in May. And Borel ended up getting the last word, becoming feminist hero in Canada in the process.

When it was presented to me that the defense would be offering us an apology, I was prepared to forego the trial. It seemed like the clearest path to the truth. A trial would have maintained his lie and would have further subjected me to the very same pattern of abuse that I am currently trying to stop.

-Kathryn Borel, statement at Toronto City Hall

April -Beyoncé

 

A force of nature. I still can’t stop watching “Formation” but the whole visual album was an amazing commentary on race and gender in the 21st century.

Always stay gracious, best revenge is your paper.

-Beyoncé in Lemonade

May – Elaine Welteroth

elaine-teen-vogue

Welteroth was named editor of Teen Vogue in May, and the 29-year-old immediately began transforming the fashion magazine into a smart, politically active, must-read. And she’s an advocate for everyone (including her staff) becoming “woke.” Follow her Twitter and Instagram – she’s also an advocate for her staff’s work in the Teen Vogue transformation.

We must make our content matter to our readers.

-Elaine Welteroth in a panel with Women in Communication

June – Lin-Manuel Miranda.


The Hamiton creator offered possibly the best awards acceptance speech ever.

And love is love is love is love is love is love is love is love is love.

-Lin-Manuel Miranda Tony acceptance speech

July -Ieshia Evans

Jonathan Bachman for Reuters

Jonathan Bachman for Reuters

Evans was arrested for protesting police shootings, including Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, in July. Her calm in the face of the police in riot gear is iconic.

Sometimes, jobs are given to you … that you didn’t really apply for. We don’t have to beg to matter. We do matter.

-Ieshia Evans to CBS This Morning

August – Simone Biles

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The most decorated American woman’s gymnast in history. And just all-around amazing.

I’d rather regret the risks that didn’t work out than the chances I didn’t take at all.

-Simon Biles Tweet

September -Jeffrey Tambor and Jill Solloway

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Stephen Lovekin/REX/Shutterstock (5899059w) Jill Soloway and Jeffrey Tambor 68th Primetime Emmy Awards, Press Room, Los Angeles, USA - 18 Sep 2016

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Stephen Lovekin/REX/Shutterstock (5899059w)
Jill Soloway and Jeffrey Tambor
68th Primetime Emmy Awards, Press Room, Los Angeles, USA – 18 Sep 2016

The Amazon comedy “Transparent” took away multiple awards at this year’s Emmy’s, including lead actor (Tambor) and director for a comedy (Solloway). The show is revolutionary, with a woman as show runner (a rare breed in Hollywood) and Tambor (a straight man) playing a transgender character.

So both used their platform as a call for action.

Please give transgender talent a chance. Give them auditions. Give them their story.

-Jeffrey Tambor, Emmy acceptance speech

Topple the patriarchy.

-Jill Solloway, Emmy acceptance speech

October – Kelly Oxford

Kelly Oxford, Getty Images

Kelly Oxford, Getty Images

When the infamous Donald Trump Access Hollywood hot-mic tape went public, Oxford didn’t just get mad. She sent out a tweet asking other women to share their stories of sexual harassment. 9 million plus stories later, she’s helping women say publicly that sexual assault is #notokay.

Women: tweet me your first assaults. they aren’t just stats. I’ll go first: Old man on city bus grabs my “pussy” and smiles at me, I’m 12.

-Kelly Oxford in a Tweet

November – Megyn Kelly

Courtesy Fox News

Courtesy Fox News

The anchor accused her former Fox News boss Roger Ailes of sexual harassment in her autobiography, following in footsteps of co-worker Gretchen Carlson, who sued Fox over the summer. But what made Kelly’s accusations so powerful to me is that she admits that she is in a position of power in relation to other women on the staff – and needed to step up. That’s feminism – realizing that your experience isn’t the same as everyone else’s and understanding when you come from a position of privilege.

Crossing him was a major risk. But what if—God forbid—he was still doing it to someone?

Megan Kelly in “Settle for More.”

December – Michelle Obama

CBS News

CBS News

The First Lady’s much-hyped interview with Oprah Winfrey was elegant and thoughtful, and even though the headlines tried to sensationalize her “not having hope” comment, what she actually said attempted to show that both sides in this highly divisive political season in the US aren’t that far apart. And that not having hoping is a thing we need to overcome together.

My desire for this country is that we remain hopeful and that we find a place in our hearts to love each other. It’s really simple, you know? Just opening up our hearts to others. Making room.

-Michele Obama to Oprah Winfrey on CBS News

Seven Beauty Truths I Learned From Pin Ups

We initially ran this post last December and it was our most popular blog ever. Seems worth a rerun as we’re back in crowdfunding season (requisite #BeABacker reminder).

Ginger Rose as seen in Pin Up! The Movie

Ginger Rose as seen in Pin Up! The Movie

1. It’s all about the red, red lips and the cat eye. Flawless makeup daily? Pish! These two small details are worth their weight in gold – putting a laser focus on two fab femme assets.

Kat Stroud by House of Winter

Kat Stroud by House of Winter

2. You don’t have to be a six foot tall model to be beautiful. Pin up tosses off fashion industry standards. Sure, long and lean works, but so does short and curvy. And everything in between.

Sydney Ralaton by Mitzi and Co. Photography

Sydney Ralston by Mitzi and Co. Photography

3. There is a time and place for sweats and Uggs. Yeah, comfort is good, but there’s a type of confidence you can get from sartorial polish.

4. “I can do anything in heels and you’re going to watch me.” Think of the old adage about Ginger Rogers – she did everything Fred Astaire did but in high heels and backwards. Now that’s power.

Pinup Little Bit by Mitzi and Co. Photography

Pinup Little Bit by Mitzi and Co. Photography

5. Sisters are doing for themselves… And each other. Sorry, guys. All this fabulousness isn’t about trying to get your attention. Pin ups know it’s women who appreciate that perfect Cupid’s bow and straight as an arrow seemed stockings.

Bang Bang Von Loola in a vintage 1930s gown and brooch by Sheila Broderick Photography

Bang Bang Von Loola in a vintage 1930s gown and brooch by Sheila Broderick Photography

6. Recycling is oh-so-fashionable. Vintage shops and thrift store finds: the ultimate in going green. Plus, the older clothes just last better than modern frocks.

Alfie Jean by Steven Jon Horner Photography

Alfie Jean by Steven Jon Horner Photography

7. It’s not about some sort of aesthetic ideal: confidence is what’s sexy.  Strength. Self-assuredness. Girl power. Yeah, it’s a cliché, but pin ups know true beauty comes from within.

Your Week In Pin Up Issue 23: The Girl Power Edition

ywipu22 February 2016

Pushing Back. Standing Together.


When Someone Has Your Back.

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Did we ever tell you how much we love Art of the Pin Up Girl and Heather Storm? South Florida, here we come!


Because, This.

Print

Official selection. That’s film festival number 5. Not that we’re counting or anything. See you in April.


Free Kesha.

Screenshot 2016-02-21 22.24.33

Big props to Demi Lovato for using her social media profile to support Kesha… and call out other “feminist” singers who don’t.

Women empowerment is speaking up for other women even when it’s something uncomfortable to speak up about.

Amen.


Age is Only a Number.

o-SABINE-570

Kudos to Sabine Reichel and Beate Pilgreen who shows that 60 really is the new 30.


Every. Playboy. Centerfold.

PBTBFRN

Ah, the uses of Imgur..


Housekeeping.

Screenshot 2016-02-21 22.17.59

I did clean out all my old screenshots from my iPad. I think my desktop may be next…


 

That Time Twitter Broke.

Screenshot 2016-02-21 22.03.55

Just trying to find out some analytics over here…


This Gif.

neon

*SWAK*

Seven Beauty Truths I Learned From Pin Ups

 

Ginger Rose as seen in Pin Up! The Movie

Ginger Rose as seen in Pin Up! The Movie

1. It’s all about the red, red lips and the cat eye. Flawless makeup daily? Pish! These two small details are worth their weight in gold – putting a laser focus on two fab femme assets.

Kat Stroud by House of Winter

Kat Stroud by House of Winter

2. You don’t have to be a six foot tall model to be beautiful. Pin up tosses off fashion industry standards. Sure, long and lean works, but so does short and curvy. And everything in between.

Sydney Ralaton by Mitzi and Co. Photography

Sydney Ralston by Mitzi and Co. Photography

3. There is a time and place for sweats and Uggs. Yeah, comfort is good, but there’s a type of confidence you can get from sartorial polish.

4. “I can do anything in heels and you’re going to watch me.” Think of the old adage about Ginger Rogers – she did everything Fred Astaire did but in high heels and backwards. Now that’s power.

Pinup Little Bit by Mitzi and Co. Photography

Pinup Little Bit by Mitzi and Co. Photography

5. Sisters are doing for themselves… And each other. Sorry, guys. All this fabulousness isn’t about trying to get your attention. Pin ups know it’s women who appreciate that perfect Cupid’s bow and straight as an arrow seemed stockings.

Bang Bang Von Loola in a vintage 1930s gown and brooch by Sheila Broderick Photography

Bang Bang Von Loola in a vintage 1930s gown and brooch by Sheila Broderick Photography

6. Recycling is oh-so-fashionable. Vintage shops and thrift store finds: the ultimate in going green. Plus, the older clothes just last better than modern frocks.

Alfie Jean by Steven Jon Horner Photography

Alfie Jean by Steven Jon Horner Photography

7. It’s not about some sort of aesthetic ideal: confidence is what’s sexy.  Strength. Self-assuredness. Girl power. Yeah, it’s a cliché, but pin ups know true beauty comes from within.

Whither Kickstarter?

I’ve been on a Kickstarter kick (see what I did there?), looking a series of really cool – or totally pin up-centric – projects.

Why bother?

Virtual reality headset used in The Ark.

Virtual reality headset used in The Ark.

Well, the whole idea of Kickstarter is social networking. You know, sharing what you like with other people and using the power of crowds to get dollars to support a creative idea. While I’m not at a point where I can donate to all of these projects, I can at least call attention to them so that others can donate.

And, who knows? Maybe some good kick-karma will come my way once we relaunch.

But I thought maybe you might care (or might not) as to why I’m pushing out things like the plight of white rhinos or women in cinema. So, some insight.


The Ark

-1

I know. What do white rhinos have to do with pin ups? Well, in this case it’s more about HOW they’re telling the story. The husband-wife team behind The Ark are using virtual reality to help viewers/users understand why it’s important to save the four remaining white rhinos in the world. There’s a full 360° perspective viewers get when wearing the VR headset.

Amazing.

I’ve been working with an interactive version of this story, and I’m really fascinated to see what documentarians are doing to push the traditional limits of storytelling. I’m kind of in awe of the work going into The Ark and the bare-budget campaign they’re doing.

Their Kickstarter is running until the morning of October 8th.


 

Aberford

49a7b9d44f678fc0e5f4e856a87e98be_original

Given the time of year, this one is a no-brainer. It’s a video game of ’50s-style housewives battling a zombie invasion. While the aesthetics are the main appeal, I’m also impressed by how carefully Sketchy Panda Games scheduled their campaign. It’s timed to not only coincide with the seasons of the television shows The Walking Dead and Fear the Walking Dead, but also works as people are getting geared up for Halloween. And zombies seem to be always, uhm, hot?

Brilliant.

Their Kickstarter runs through October 18th.


Kicking Ass and Wearing Heels

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This book project features pin up-style illustrations of women who also are pretty bad-ass. It’s all aesthetics for me here. And a little bit of the girl power thing.

Their Kickstarter runs through October 22nd.


Jamie and Danielle DIM

 

193693b71929f47a339d1d5d48cae027_originalWhat can I say about this comic book? I mean, I’m just completely blown away by what artist Katie (Cat) Meyers wants to do. The aesthetics are amazing. She’s a female artist in a pretty male dominated world.

But really, it’s all about the story.

Danielle DIM is using the graphic style of the comic book to raise awareness of mental health issues, specifically adult depression. I’m fortunate that I don’t struggle with depression, but I know a lot of people that do. The illness is tricky and mean and needs to be recognized as just as serious as something like diabetes. Or HIV/AIDS. Or any of the other chronic diseases that people deal with every day.

Their Kickstarter runs through October 30th.


Directed by Women

dbwcollage

Sometime last year, I committed to give in kind services to the Directed by Women global viewing party via the crowdfunding platform Seed and Spark. That meant blog posts, social media updates, and lots of other things to help spread the word about the great work women directors are doing.

Ok, yeah, I have a vested interest here. I am a woman director.

And yeah, when only one female director has won the Academy Award ever, there is something of a glass ceiling going on.

invited

The global viewing party ran through September 15th. But there’s a new push afoot using the hashtag #52FilmsByWomen. Because watching films by women isn’t just something to be done for a few days in September.

52filmsbywomen

 

Alice Guy-Blaché

Gaumont_Disk1-219x311This is on my must-watch list this month. Alice Guy-Blaché is regarded as the first female director, and she created more than ONE THOUSAND films in the US and France between 1896 and 1920. According to historian Joan Simon, Guy-Blaché was the first to develop narrative filmmaking, or the idea that the film should be a story with a beginning, middle and end.

She had one of the longest careers of any of the early cinema pioneers, and she was one of the first two female filmmakers to own her own studio

All while raising two daughters.

Talk about girl power.

You can get her films on DVD, or see them September 26th at the Nighthawk Cinema in Brooklyn.

800px-Alice_Guy