Your Week In Pin Up, Issue 58: The You Know We’re Hot Edition

10 July 2017

We’re Not Talking About the Weather


The I-Doc is Getting Closer

The initial release will have a series of features on global pin ups plus some never-bef0re-seen footage from our film.


Slips Sales are Slipping

It’s a sign of the times… Via USA Today.


So We’re Taking a Poll: To Slip or Not to Slip?

C’mon ladies –  do you wear slips? And gents, what do you think of slips?


Turning On, Tuning In, and Dropping Out

Via VICE

Or, the real life version of The Beach. Ah, kids these days.


This. GIF.

Well, we ARE slip-obsessed this week.

*SWAK*

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Free Vintage Sewing Patterns

1950s McCalls pattern, designed by Givenchy.

This is a gold mine.

The Vintage Patterns Wikia has out-of print patterns from the 1900s-1970s available online.

1920s McCalls pattern

Let me repeat that. Sewing patterns from the 1900s-1970s. Out of print. Online. For sale from vendors.

1940s Wedding Gown pattern from ABC Schnitt

Here’s what the site says about what they’re doing:

We are working to create one location online where people can go to browse through vintage patterns starting from the year 1992 and older and share information about them.

Vintage Vogue pattern from the 1930s.

The vendors include names we know, including Butterick, McCalls, Vogue, and Simplicity. But it also includes vendors long out of print before I began sewing, like Advance, Hollywood, and DuBarry.

Simplicity 1950s evening gown.

This is an absolute treasure trove for anyone interested in making vintage wear. Not all of the patterns are available… but one can dream.

DuBerry 1944 dress pattern.

 

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The Bata Shoe Museum

The Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto.

I was in Toronto doing archival research and presenting at a conference and came across the gem of the Bata Shoe Museum. It’s the in the northwest-ish section of the city, near the University of Toronto.

It’s amazing.

I posted some of the images from the museum on Instagram, but one exhibit really caught my attention. It’s called Fashion Victims: The Pleasures and Perils of Dress in the 19th Century. It looked at the role the industrial revolution had in the process of making shoes, and the fashion connected with footwear.

From the wall text at the exhibit:

In stark contrast to the somber business suits and sensible shoes worn by men, 18th- century-inspired fashion reinforced negative notions about women as slaves to fashion. It also helped to frame womens’ role as consumers rather than producers.

Gold bespoke boots at the Bata Shoe Museum.

This pair of boots is a great example of that. They have high heels, highly impractical, but hearkening back to court styling of the 1700s. They’re bespoke, and the handmade detail was necessary to differentiate upper class women from those from lower classes, who were wearing fashionable machine crafted shoes such as the lovely blue boots below. Upper boots feature custom gold details and were made for the individual, the lower, novel elasticized gussets for greater flexibility (in other words, they were mass produced and could fit a greater variety of foot shapes).

Mass produced boots, at the Bata Shoe Museum.

I had no idea that the color “mauve” was discovered as British chemist William Henry Perkins was trying to discover a cure for malaria. He came up with a new dye that made the formerly-royal color of purple accessible to the masses. According to the wall text at the museum, it also made Perkins a very wealthy man. The color was a huge success.

Mauve shoes at the Bata Shoe Museum.

 

I love this pair of red boudoir slippers, which, like the gold-plated bespoke boots above, have high heels reminiscent of 18th century styles. They’re so completely impractical, but completely lovely, with the severe point at the toe and the ribbons to anchor the shoe to the foot. Of course, something like this would never be worn outside. But that’s part of their pleasure.

Boudoir slippers at the Bata Shoe Museum.

 

The Hats Have It

It’s Derby Day and I’m officially working here.

Seriously.

Because, hats.

All photos from Getty Images.

Getty Images / Patrick Smith

Must start with mint juleps…

 

 

Getty Images / Michael Reaves

Then add feathers.

Getty Images / Patrick Smith

A fascinator is always fascinating.

Thur Dao of Cincinnati by Getty Images / Michael Noble Jr.

Then add roses….

Getty Images / Patrick Smith

Even more roses…

Getty Images / Gregory Shamus

And add a pony, just in case yours comes in out of the money.

#DerbyDay

 

Met! Met! Met!

It’s the Super Bowl of Fashion. And who cares about the theme. The DRESSES.

Here’s what I’m loving tonight. All photos via The New York Times.

Continuing my Janelle Monae girl crush.


Janelle Monae in Ralph Russo. Benjamin Norman for The New York Times

And then, Rita Orr…. ravishing in red.


Rita Ora. Benjamin Norman for The New York Times

The structure of this number.


Kate Bosworth. Benjamin Norman for The New York Times

So much this….. Note how Future’s tie ties into Jourdan Dunn’s train.


Future and Jourdan Dunn wearing custom H&M. Benjamin Norman for The New York Times

I’d be wearing a see through jumpsuit too if I could rock it like Halle Berry.

Halle Berry in Donatella Versace. Benjamin Norman for The New York Times

Everything about this is on point.

Lily Collins wearing Giambattista Valli. Benjamin Norman for The New York Times

Your Week in Pin Up, Issue 45: The Academy Awards Edition

ywipu27 Feburary 2017

We’re All About the Dress

(in no particular order)


Viola Davis

oscars-red-carpet-1769-viola-davis-superjumbo-v3

We are the only profession that celebrates what it is to live a life.

Best supporting actress. Channeling the ’80s.

Dress by Armani Prive, jewels by Niwaka, bag by Bally, shoes by Stuart Weitzman.


Dakota Johnson

dakota-jkohnson

Dress by Gucci. Old-style Hollywood glamour. Like from the ’30s.


Emma Stone

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Best actress. ’20s fringe. Swoon.

Dress by Givenchy Haute Couture by Riccardo Tisci.


Nicole Kidman

kidman

Dress by Armani Prive.

Stunning.


Janelle Monae

janelle-monae-220b807bd2ec5503

She’s been on-point all awards season.

Dress by Elie Saab, jewels by Forevermark Diamonds.


Brie Larson

brielarson

The train!

Dress by Oscar de la Renta, jewels by Neil Lane, shoes by Aquazzura.


Pharell Williams & Mimi Valdes

gettyimages-645633864_master-nocrop-w1800-h1330-2x

Grey hair don’t care.


Leslie Mann

gettyimages-645630916_master-nocrop-w1800-h1330-2x

The color.

Dress by Zac Posen, jewels by Lorraine Schwartz, clutch and shoes by Jimmy Choo.


Hailee Steinfeld

oscars-red-carpet-587-hailee-steinfeld-superjumbo

Ethereal.

Dress by Ralph & Russo, jewels by Neil Lane, shoes by Charlotte Olympia, clutch Judith Lieber.


And Jackie Chan

gettyimages-645626444_master-nocrop-w1800-h1330-2x

Because, pandas.

*SWAK*

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Those We Lost – Fashion and Art

We’ve been looking back at 2016, featuring some of the people who died during the past year from the world of music and the world of film. Today we turn our focus to fashion and art.

January – André Courrèges (born 1923)

A Courrèges creation, circa 196

A Courrèges creation, circa 196

Courrèges would be especially influential in the 1960s, creating the go-go boot and helping to spread the popularity of the miniskirt.

Courrèges’ clothes are so beautiful, everyone should look the same, dressed in silver. Silver merges into everything, costumes should be worn during the day with lots of make-up.

-Andy Warhol, quoted in France 24

February – Peter Marlowe (born 1952)

GB. ENGLAND. Liverpool. Kirkby Boys club disco. November 1985.

GB. ENGLAND. Liverpool. Kirkby Boys club disco. November 1985.

The British-born photographer worked for the News Agency Magnum.

I go for photography that overlays and enhances. By blending observation and wit with reason, I want my work to generate a sense of the unexpected, the hidden, and the seemingly spontaneous.

-magnumphotos.com

March – Bob Adelman (born 1940)

Brooklyn Civil Rights protests, 1963.

Brooklyn Civil Rights protests, 1963.

His work with the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s is amazing – and aside from the fashions could have been taken at Black Lives Matter protests this year.

A single individual could not stand up. But as a group, they could.

-interview with NPR

April – Fred Hayman (born 1925)

Fred Hayman in Giorgio Beverly Hills. Los Angeles Times.

Fred Hayman in Giorgio Beverly Hills. Los Angeles Times.

Hayman is credited with creating Rodeo Drive as a luxury fashion destination, when he opened Giorgio Beverly Hills in 1961.

May – Matt Irwin (born 1980)

Lady Gaga by Matt Irwin for Elle.

Lady Gaga by Matt Irwin for Elle.

Irwin was known as one of the first “digital native” celebrity photographers. He also photographed Nicki Minaj, Rihanna and others.

June – Bill Cunningham (born 1929)

bill-cunningham-slide-ixkv-videosixteenbynine480-v2

The New York Times fashion photographer introduced generations of Americans to haute couture.

Fashion is as vital and as interesting today as ever. I know what people with a more formal attitude mean when they say they’re horrified by what they see on the street. But fashion is doing its job. It’s mirroring exactly our times.

-Cunningham in the New York Times

July – Geneviève Castrée (born 1981)

pamplemoussi-genevieve-castree-l-uyephw

There is an amazing group of (French) Canadian women doing comic book art. Castrée was an up and coming star.

August – Sonia Rykiel (born 1930)

Sonia Rykiel at a show in 1993. The Telegraph.

Sonia Rykiel at a runway show in 1993. The Telegraph.

Her fashions were as iconic as her hair.

How can you live the high life if you don’t wear the high heels?

September – George Barris (born 1922)

George Barris, Marilyn Monroe, 1963

George Barris, Marilyn Monroe, 1963

Marilyn was his muse.

What I particularly liked about Marilyn was that she didn’t act like a movie star. I was most impressed that Marilyn was always polite and friendly to everyone on the set. She was no phony or snob.

-George Barris to the Huffington Post

October – George Galanos (born 1924)

Galanos 1953 chiffon dress.

Galanos 1953 chiffon dress.

He would spend nearly a half century in the fashion industry, designing haute couture, ready to wear, and as a film costumer.

How many women can wear just a patch over their crotch and a bra? Aren’t you embarrassed when you see a young girl walking down the street practically naked? Fashion is geared only to young people today. All we see is Levi’s and bare bellies to the point of nausea. There are no clothes for elegant women. Let’s face it, some of the things you see in the paper are absolutely monstrous looking – and I’m not squeamish. God knows I made sexy clothes in my day, but there’s a point when you have to say, ‘Enough, already.’

-James Galanos to WWD in 2002

November – Gwen Ifill (born 1955)

Gwen Ifill at the Peabody Awards, 2009. Anders Krusberg / Peabody Awards.

Gwen Ifill at the Peabody Awards, 2009. Anders Krusberg / Peabody Awards.

The Peabody Award-winning American television journalist was a groundbreaker who stood out from her peers.

I was drawn to journalism because of the need to be the necessary voice – not to force my opinions on others but to broaden the stage for the debate. And along the way, I have to say, there were some perks. I was played by Queen Latifah twice on ‘Saturday Night Live.’

-Gwen Ifill at American University

December – China Machado (born 1928)

China Machado by Richard Avendon, 1958.

China Machado by Richard Avendon, 1958.

Machado was the first non-white supermodel, fist appearing in magazines in 1958. Richard Avedon considered her his muse.

You can’t worry about aging because that’s the worst thing. If you start, then you just keep finding more things you don’t like, and then you’re finished.

-Quoted in the New York Times

Seven Beauty Truths I Learned From Pin Ups

We initially ran this post last December and it was our most popular blog ever. Seems worth a rerun as we’re back in crowdfunding season (requisite #BeABacker reminder).

Ginger Rose as seen in Pin Up! The Movie

Ginger Rose as seen in Pin Up! The Movie

1. It’s all about the red, red lips and the cat eye. Flawless makeup daily? Pish! These two small details are worth their weight in gold – putting a laser focus on two fab femme assets.

Kat Stroud by House of Winter

Kat Stroud by House of Winter

2. You don’t have to be a six foot tall model to be beautiful. Pin up tosses off fashion industry standards. Sure, long and lean works, but so does short and curvy. And everything in between.

Sydney Ralaton by Mitzi and Co. Photography

Sydney Ralston by Mitzi and Co. Photography

3. There is a time and place for sweats and Uggs. Yeah, comfort is good, but there’s a type of confidence you can get from sartorial polish.

4. “I can do anything in heels and you’re going to watch me.” Think of the old adage about Ginger Rogers – she did everything Fred Astaire did but in high heels and backwards. Now that’s power.

Pinup Little Bit by Mitzi and Co. Photography

Pinup Little Bit by Mitzi and Co. Photography

5. Sisters are doing for themselves… And each other. Sorry, guys. All this fabulousness isn’t about trying to get your attention. Pin ups know it’s women who appreciate that perfect Cupid’s bow and straight as an arrow seemed stockings.

Bang Bang Von Loola in a vintage 1930s gown and brooch by Sheila Broderick Photography

Bang Bang Von Loola in a vintage 1930s gown and brooch by Sheila Broderick Photography

6. Recycling is oh-so-fashionable. Vintage shops and thrift store finds: the ultimate in going green. Plus, the older clothes just last better than modern frocks.

Alfie Jean by Steven Jon Horner Photography

Alfie Jean by Steven Jon Horner Photography

7. It’s not about some sort of aesthetic ideal: confidence is what’s sexy.  Strength. Self-assuredness. Girl power. Yeah, it’s a cliché, but pin ups know true beauty comes from within.

Miami Fashion Network Loves our Documentary About Pin Up Culture

Check out what our new friends at Miami Fashion Network have to say about our screening at the Palm Beach International Film Festial a week from Satruday. 

  
March 31, 2016 – Miami Fashion Network
We think the biggest April fashion event in Miami revolves around a super chic documentary movie. Pin Up! The Movie is showing in the Palm Beach International Film Festival. “Pin-up and vintage culture are exploding – and no one’s made a movie about it,” says filmmaker Kathleen Ryan. 
This movie about fashion design follows a group of women through their everyday lives, showing why they’re drawn to the retro style. There are two interrelated stories. In one, a group of women compete for the title of Miss 1940s White Christmas Ball. In the other, an established pin-up photographer and her crew seek a fresh face for a magazine spread. 
“People think that the pin up is just something men look at,” says Ryan. However “All the women I’ve talked with say they’re doing this for themselves. They love the power, beauty and sisterhood in the culture. The modern pin up is a pretty feminist creature.”
The fashion and style of Miami are the perfect setting for the initial screenings of the film. Much of the original pin-up genre sprung from the sensual style of Miami, a locale that always encouraged women to appear more alluring. 
Today’s Miami fashion set continues to celebrate the power of femininity, from our super sexy night clubs to our sultry hotel pool parties. Plus there is cauldron of creativity mixing fashion designers, fashionable restaurants and hotels, and photography. The Pin Up culture is alive and well among the fashion crowd of Miami. 

Seven Beauty Truths I Learned From Pin Ups

 

Ginger Rose as seen in Pin Up! The Movie

Ginger Rose as seen in Pin Up! The Movie

1. It’s all about the red, red lips and the cat eye. Flawless makeup daily? Pish! These two small details are worth their weight in gold – putting a laser focus on two fab femme assets.

Kat Stroud by House of Winter

Kat Stroud by House of Winter

2. You don’t have to be a six foot tall model to be beautiful. Pin up tosses off fashion industry standards. Sure, long and lean works, but so does short and curvy. And everything in between.

Sydney Ralaton by Mitzi and Co. Photography

Sydney Ralston by Mitzi and Co. Photography

3. There is a time and place for sweats and Uggs. Yeah, comfort is good, but there’s a type of confidence you can get from sartorial polish.

4. “I can do anything in heels and you’re going to watch me.” Think of the old adage about Ginger Rogers – she did everything Fred Astaire did but in high heels and backwards. Now that’s power.

Pinup Little Bit by Mitzi and Co. Photography

Pinup Little Bit by Mitzi and Co. Photography

5. Sisters are doing for themselves… And each other. Sorry, guys. All this fabulousness isn’t about trying to get your attention. Pin ups know it’s women who appreciate that perfect Cupid’s bow and straight as an arrow seemed stockings.

Bang Bang Von Loola in a vintage 1930s gown and brooch by Sheila Broderick Photography

Bang Bang Von Loola in a vintage 1930s gown and brooch by Sheila Broderick Photography

6. Recycling is oh-so-fashionable. Vintage shops and thrift store finds: the ultimate in going green. Plus, the older clothes just last better than modern frocks.

Alfie Jean by Steven Jon Horner Photography

Alfie Jean by Steven Jon Horner Photography

7. It’s not about some sort of aesthetic ideal: confidence is what’s sexy.  Strength. Self-assuredness. Girl power. Yeah, it’s a cliché, but pin ups know true beauty comes from within.