Meet the Musicians Part 7: BENSOUND

While in most of the film I was looking for very specific pop music to help echo the message of that section of the film, when I was talking about (spoiler alert) Miss Emilie’s illness I wanted to find something that was atmospheric but also unobtrusive. Something that would help reinforce the emotion of the scene without overpowering it.

Emilie

Miss Emilie, after her illness.

In other words, I was looking for something that is a traditional soundtrack.

You can search for royalty free music out there. While the reality is that much of this sort of music is being composed on a computer, when it’s done well it sounds like an orchestrated soundtrack.

The key phrase: when it’s done well.

Screenshot 2015-11-01 13.02.31

My Google royalty free music search results.

As I was slogging through the royalty free sludge, I was getting the feeling that me working in Garage Band would have a better chance of finding the right sound. The music was either too over the top or it sounded as if it had been done on a first-generation Casio. Yes, I know the adage you get what you pay for. But still.

Me, after listening to approximately 23,796 craptastic royalty free songs.

Me, after listening to approximately 23,796 craptastic royalty free songs.

And then I found Bensound.

His name actually is Benjamin Tissot and he’s a French composer who’s been doing music for over a decade. I’m using his track Better Days in the film. He describes it this way:

Slow ambient cinematic piece with a melancholic and sad feel. The minimalist guitar part is accompanied by soft strings.

It’s really quite perfect.

creative_commons

At the moment I’m using the song under a Creative Commons License. That means I credit him using specific language and he won’t require a royalty. In exchange, I have no expectation of exclusivity. I appreciate that he allows that.

But I still want to pay him.

#BeABacker

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s